Non Invasive Treatment for Back Pain

The human skeleton is shaped by natural evolution for a lifetime of walking upright in two legs, rather than on four, and this gave our early ancestors many advantages. A few million years ago, those early ancestors gave up their tree-bound lifestyle for a lifetime of running and hunting game across the African plains, and today, the human form features an S-shaped spine, an upright pelvis, long legs, and arched feet. This shape is well suited to fighting gravity, but still, this form of locomotion takes a toll sooner or later. Even with modern science and medicine, many people around the world suffer from spinal distress and lower back pain, and the most serious spinal injury cases call for surgery. But most chronic back pain cases don’t require that; instead, non invasive rehab tools and systems can be used, and these range from handheld algometers to physical therapy equipment like chiropractic adjustment tools. How might this work, and how often do Americans suffer from back issues?

When and Why Back Pain Happens

Every year, many studies and surveys are done to track the current state of American public health, and that includes back pain and spinal issues. The numbers show that around one in three women and one in four men suffer from back pain issues (chronic or not), and around 31 million people experience full-blown chronic back pain at any given time. In fact, around half of all working-class Americans admit to getting back pain symptoms each year, and experts believe that fully 80% of all Americans will experience back pain at some point during their lives.

What are some common causes of all this back pain? There are many but some of the most common ones include experiencing car crashes or sports injuries that can distress the spine and strain the muscles. Meanwhile, many surveyed Americans also blame ongoing stress for their spinal issues, and a pregnant woman may experience stress on her back. Working years of hard manual labor is also known to stress and wear out the back and spine, which is likely to cause chronic back pain later in life (even after retirement). Finally, simple old age can cause a person’s spine to collapse on itself and bend forwards after many years of fighting gravity, and this tends to inflame the spine’s joints, pinch nerves and muscles, and reduce mobility. All of this can cause chronic pain. All this and more is why Americans rely on physical therapy equipment at hospitals or a chiropractor’s aid to get better.

Physical Therapy Equipment and More for Back Pain

As mentioned earlier, it is only the most serious back injury cases that call for surgery, such as slipped discs, while everyday back pain and chronic pain can be treated with non invasive medicine that doesn’t break the skin or involve drugs. For example, imagine someone who got into a car crash or a sports accident, and is now in the hospital. That patient may undergo physical therapy (PT) at the hands of a therapist, and this may include performing stretches, poses, and exercises on command to restore balance, mobility, and strength over time. A therapist may use physical therapy equipment such as handheld algometers to measure a patient’s pain threshold without breaking the skin. Similar devices can also test muscle resistance strength. Meanwhile, the therapist can use functional assessment software to create a recovery routine for the patient, and motion capture cameras will record the patient’s movements and feed them to the program for reference.

Many Americans also visit their doctors for chronic back pain, and in fact, back pain ranks second among all reasons Americans visit their doctors, behind only upper respiratory issues. From there, a doctor may refer them to a chiropractor or yoga expert for help, and the numbers show that around 27 million Americans visit chiropractors every year. A chiropractor can use simple adjustment tools and even their bare hands to readjust bones and muscles, to relieve pressure on joints, nerves, and muscle groups and restore mobility while also clearing up pain. A patient may get similar results, loosening up their muscles and joints, when they sign up for private yoga sessions at a studio to perform therapeutic bends, poses, and stretches.