Archive for May 21, 2018

4 Reasons You Might Volunteer to Take a Drug or DNA Test

Written by Your New Trainer on . Posted in Uncategorized

There are many reasons one might choose to take either a drug test or a DNA paternity test. Most people probably think that these tools are primarily used by employers or courts to ensure the truth in someone’s statements, but more often than you would expect, individuals choose to take these tests of their own volition. Here are a few instances in which this is the case.

  1. Affairs: If you are in the unfortunate situation where you are uncertain whether or not a child is genetically yours, you might consider a DNA paternity test. If you believe your partner has been unfaithful and the baby isn’t genetically your own, your curiosity could cause you to take a paternity test to find out the truth. Today, paternity tests are producing results with 99.999% confidence. In the past, they were only 80% accurate. If you want the truth in this situation, you know how to get it.
  2. Inheritance:This situation might be rare, but it still does happen. Imagine you are the estranged child of a wealthy oil tycoon. Suddenly, your biological parent passed away. In their will, they left you everything. As sad as you are, you might decide to take a DNA test to prove that you are indeed the beneficiary in question.
  3. To Learn: On the more shady side of life, drug users might buy drug test kits in preparation for an upcoming drug screening for work. They can use this store bought test to learn whether or not they will pass the one for work.
  4. For Safety: Breathalyzers are not only used by officers. Conscientious alcohol consumers carry a breathalyzer with them when they go out for a night at the bar knowing that they intend to drive home. By bringing a breathalyzer to use on themselves, they can prevent themselves from driving over the limit.

While drug and DNA tests are mostly used to keep people honest, they can also be used by people who volunteer to take the test. The reasons some people want to take the test can be either noble or lascivious in nature. Still, it’s good to know that these tools are useful for many different situations.

Everything You Need to Know About HRT as a Treatment for Osteoporosis

Written by Your New Trainer on . Posted in Uncategorized

If you’re about to go through menopause, which typically occurs around the age of 51, you may already be dreading the common side effects such as mood swings and hot flashes. Along with these common side effects, you may also experience issues with your bones and joints.

While problems with your bones and joints may not be as apparent, going through menopause will definitely have an impact on them. These issues are due to the fact that you tend to lose a lot of estrogen during that period of time. This is especially dangerous for someone who is at high risk of osteoporosis.

If you are about to go through menopause, there’s a treatment option for you: estrogen hormone replacement therapy. This treatment can help prevent osteoporosis as a whole or treat it if it does develop.

If you are interested in the hormone replacement therapy, you must first qualify as a good candidate. Estrogen replacement therapy is typically fine for most women, but if you have breast or uterine cancer, history of blood clots, or liver disease you should avoid it. Estrogen replacement therapy isn’t good for anyone who is pre-menopausal, nor should it be an option for hormone therapy for men.

Typically when someone takes estrogen as a form of hormone replacement therapy, they will also be administered progesterone. If someone were to take estrogen alone, they would have a greater risk of developing uterine cancer. This is why both progesterone and estrogen must be taken together. However, if you have had your uterus removed or were born without one you can take estrogen without progesterone.

Hormone replacement therapy should be started during early menopause. However, many doctors believe that estrogen can be taken more than a decade after menopause because they feel that the bone-preserving benefits are still accessible. The therapy will usually be administered as estrogen supplements or as a skin patch, so there’s no need to worry about surgeries. The hormone supplements are typically taken daily, but ask your doctor for specific dosage information.